The California Supreme Court recently ruled that employers in California must pay their employees for even small amounts of time that an employee spends on tasks after the employee has clocked out. In Troester v. Starbucks, the Plaintiff claimed that he spent a few minutes after clocking out on tasks such as locking the store and.. read more →

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The California Supreme Court recently issued a ruling that will make it even more difficult for companies to prove that an individual is an independent contractor. Since 1989, Courts have used a multi-factor test that focuses mostly on how much “control” the employer had over the way the worker performs. In the case Dynamex Operations.. read more →

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04 Jan 2018
January 4, 2018

New Laws for 2018!

January 4, 2018 0 Comment

The California legislature was busy once again, enacting several new laws that will impact California employers. Here is a list of some of the most critical laws: Salary Information Employers will be prohibited from seeking salary history information from applicants and/or past employers. Employers will be required upon reasonable request to provide the pay scale.. read more →

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09 Nov 2017
November 9, 2017

Beware of Retaliation Claims!

November 9, 2017 0 Comment

New Senate Bill 306  Allows Employee to Force Reinstatement On October 3, 2017 Governor Jerry Brown signed into law Senate Bill 306. This law will allow an employee or the labor commissioner to obtain a court order that the employee be reinstated while the employee’s retaliation claim is pending. When the law goes into effect.. read more →

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25 Jan 2017
January 25, 2017

New Laws for 2017

January 25, 2017 0 Comment

California legislators did it again! They passed a myriad of new laws that impact employers. Here is a list of some of the most critical laws that go into effect in 2017: Minimum Wage Increases Minimum wage increased on January 1, 2017 to $10.50 for employers with 26 or more employees. This minimum wage increase.. read more →

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28 Nov 2016
November 28, 2016

New Overtime Rules Blocked by Preliminary Injunction

November 28, 2016 0 Comment

A Federal judge in Texas granted a preliminary injunction that prevents the new federal overtime rules from taking effect. As many of you know, the new federal overtime rules would have required employers to pay employees a minimum of $47,476 to classify the employees as exempt from overtime. Employers were supposed to comply starting December.. read more →

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The California Legislature is considering two bills that would create more burden and exposure to employers in the State. One bill, AB 2416, would allow employees to place a wage lien on property owned by the employer for wages, penalties, interest and the cost of the lien. The lien could even be placed on the.. read more →

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15 Oct 2013
October 15, 2013

New Protection for Victims of Domestic Violence

October 15, 2013 0 Comment

Governor Jerry Brown recently signed a law that will make it illegal for employers to discriminate against employees who are victims of domestic violence or those who are experiencing stalking or sexual assault. Under the law, employers cannot terminate or discriminate against an employee because he or she has been a victim. The employer will.. read more →

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15 Jan 2013
January 15, 2013

New Employment Laws for 2013

January 15, 2013 0 Comment

The California legislature is always busy making new laws. And making laws that impact employers seems to be a favorite. Here is a rundown of several new laws that affect employers for 2013. 1. Social Media Access California employers are now forbidden from requiring or requesting current employees or applicants to (a) reveal their username.. read more →

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08 Aug 2012
August 8, 2012

Terminations Can Lead to Litigation. What Can You Do?

August 8, 2012 0 Comment

Every termination has the potential of leading to a lawsuit. Here are several things every employer should think about to minimize that risk. 1.    Terminating an Employee for Absenteeism: Be careful not to terminate an employee for an absence that is protected under the FMLA, ADA or jury-duty. But if the absences are not protected,.. read more →

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